THE GLOBAL MANUFACTURING & INDUSTRIALISATION SUMMIT

#GMIS2019 Agenda

  • 09.00-09.15 OFFICIAL OPENING REMARKS: GMIS2019 Stated Aims and Vision

    Welcome to Yekaterinburg, welcome to the future of manufacturing.

  • 09.15-09.45 OFFICIAL OPENING SPEECHES: The New Era of Manufacturing Part I: What is the Vision and Impact of Industrialisation 4.0?

    Setting the tone for the 2nd Global Manufacturing and Industrialisation Summit, this opening leader session will look at the impact of industry 4.0, based on digitalisation, robotics and big data and how it affects all aspects of the way goods are produced and consumed globally, with profound implications for trade, investment and development. Is the new industrialisation supporting or impeding the advancement of the SDGs?

  • 09.45-10.15 KEYNOTE PANEL: The New Era of Manufacturing Part II: Manufacturing and its Role in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

    This panel will discuss key points raised therein through the lens of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

  • 10.15-10.45 KEYNOTE PANEL DISCUSSION: What Role Can and Must Manufacturers Play in Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development?

    Reducing poverty, increasing wellbeing – without destroying the planet. What role can – and should – the manufacturing industry play in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals? How can businesses help inject essential pragmatism and prioritisation? How can businesses be embraced by governments yet also held to account?

     

  • 10.45-11.00 FLASH OF INSIGHT: The Man-Machine Interface – Augmenting Human Senses through Digitalisation

    For centuries, humans have relied on machines to automate and accelerate previously labour-intensive, and even otherwise impossible, processes. As we start to embrace a fourth industrial revolution characterised by connectivity and IoT (Internet of Things), Big Data, and Artificial Intelligence, the line between humans and machines is set to become even more blurred.

    Not only can machines now augment our physical and mental capabilities, they can further our senses too. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to hear from an industry visionary exploring some of the most exciting industrial solutions being advanced today – solutions that, thanks to advancements in data, computing power, and connectivity pipes, can take human senses to previously unimaginable levels and drive unparalleled industrial performance improvements as a result.

     

  • 11.30-12.30 PANEL DISCUSSION: Industrial Policy and Development in the Advent of 4IR

    The advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, being ‘organic’ in nature, was not the result of a conscious strategy or industrial policy, allowing the private sector to move ahead with little or no government involvement. With a changing and increasingly diverse landscape, this has shifted to greater government involvement, both in already industrialised economies, but also in developing nations, where adoption is still in its infancy. This panel will discuss the role of industrial policy in the advent of 4IR, with special emphasis given to developing countries and looking at how the intelligent crafting of industrial policy is becoming a crucial activity for governments

  • 12.30-13.30 LUNCH AND MARKETPLACE VISIT

  • 13.30-14.10 PANEL DISCUSSION: Africa and Industrialisation: Who’s Winning – And What’s at Stake?

    The impact of Industry 4.0 and its associated digitisation of manufacturing, driven by computing power, connectivity and new forms of human-machine interaction is anticipated to be wide and profound. What does it mean for Africa and African manufacturing? For African countries, some of the biggest challenges include connectivity and accessibility constraints. Against this backdrop, African leaders are laying out their own vision for a prosperous Africa based on inclusive growth and sustainable development, with a uniquely African spin. The particular context of Africa also requires new thinking on policy and the creation of a structural transformation roadmap that shifts productive resources from agriculture and mining to manufacturing – which has helped many countries achieve greater prosperity. What sort of manufacturing renaissance should Africa look to achieve? What are the key industries and countries to watch? What can help strengthen the manufacturing base and reduce dependence on natural resource exports? What is the status of Agenda 2063? How can Africa benefit more from acting as the raw materials basket of the world?

     

  • 14.10-14.50 PANEL DISCUSSION: Is Latin America Ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

    Growing levels of automation have discouraged multinationals from outsourcing production to certain emerging economies including some in Latin America where corporations once preferred to take advantage of cheap labour. To prepare for the less labour-intensive era of Industry 4.0, Latin American countries are starting to invest in education and training to ensure workforce upskilling. Against this backdrop, Latin America’s role as a major agricultural provider also raises questions around transition economies and the important challenges to positive industrial transformation. What is needed to ensure sustainable and positive industrialisation and scale-up in Latin America? What models are right for Latin America? What does Latin America’s increasingly important role in feeding the world mean for manufacturing and industrialisation?

    Growing levels of automation have discouraged multinationals from outsourcing production to certain emerging economies including some in Latin America where corporations once preferred to take advantage of low-cost labour. To prepare for the less labour-intensive era of Industry 4.0, Latin American countries are starting to invest in education and training to ensure workforce upskilling. Against this backdrop, Latin America’s role as a major natural resource provider also raises questions around transition economies and the important challenges to positive industrial transformation. What is needed to ensure sustainable and positive industrialisation and scale-up in Latin America? What industrial strategies are right for Latin America? What does Latin America’s increasingly important role in feeding the world mean for manufacturing and industrialisation?

  • 14.50-15:30 PANEL DISCUSSION: Industry 4.0 Done the ASEAN Way

    ASEAN is already a major manufacturing hub, but key initiatives could stimulate substantial growth in the sector: the implementation of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) integration plan, which aims to increase intra-regional and global trade; attracting more production from multinationals as labour costs rise in China; and the application of big data and mobile internet, disruptive technologies where many ASEAN manufacturing firms lag behind their multinational counterparts. With machines doing the work of factories and shifts in global trade sentiment, ASEAN’s export-led manufacturing model for prosperity is also coming under scrutiny. What are the trends shaping ASEAN manufacturing? What technology is being harnessed – what technology has yet to be capitalised on? What new industrial strategies are being conceptualised in ASEAN? What are the key industries to watch? Will the ‘mighty five’ countries replace China as the World’s Workshop?

  • 13.30-14.15 BREAKOUT 1.1: Agriculture: Robotics, AI and the Food Security Challenge

    With multiple challenges including the demands for increased productivity while driving sustainability standards and decreasing environmental impact, the agri sector is looking for new innovations to transfer technologies and increase the use of robotics. This session will focus on the use and growth of AI and robotics in agriculture. This session will also interweave the theme of food security and the SDGs relating to this area.

  • 14.30-15.15 BREAKOUT 1.2: Redesigning the Future of Fashion and Textile Manufacturing

    The fashion industry is one of the most complex global production networks. The complexity and fragmentation of the fashion supply chain can make it difficult for fashion brands to keep track of where and how their products are made. As a result, many fashion brands across segments lack traceability and full visibility of their supply chain, and they often do not know where the raw materials used in their products come from. Frontrunners are looking beyond the core business to distinguish their brand through transparency and improved approaches to workforce practices. What lessons can be learned by other manufacturing sectors from fashion and textiles?

  • 13.30-14.15 BREAKOUT 1.3: ‘Anything at Your Fingertips’: The Evolution of 3D Printing beyond the Hype

    As 3D printing becomes increasingly accessible and moves beyond the hobbyist maker movement, thought leaders are increasingly focusing on the question of ‘What can’t we print?’ What would happen if 3D printers became as commonplace as microwaves? How can 3D printing create positive impact and contribute to the democratisation of manufacturing?

    Designed to showcase key trends, market predictions, uses and steps to accelerate the 3D printing journey, this Assembly will also include a special aerospace and defence industry showcase.

     

  • 14.30-15.15 BREAKOUT 1.4: Human Robot Interaction in Collaborative Manufacturing Environments

    This workshop will focus on the design, development and deployment of hardware/software systems for the recognition – by humans and generation – by robots of social behaviours that enable robots to be more effective cobots in real- world collaborative manufacturing environments. A key focus area will be the showcasing of bi-directional communications for closed- loop operations in human- robot scenarios.

  • 15.15-15.30 Delegate transition to The Arena for Afternoon Plenary Session

  • 15.30-16.30 PANEL DISCUSSION: The Circular Economy for Manufacturing: At a Crossroads

    Global resource scarcity has moved beyond being a concern just for environmentalists to becoming a key agenda item for businesses and governments. Creating a viable circular economy, inspired by living systems and designed to recover and reuse products and materials, develop product design with future material recovery in mind puts manufacturing a new threshold – and requires a new mindset. This panel will look at how moving from ‘take, make, dispose’ to ‘make, remake, reuse’ can, and is moving from theory to practice. Despite the seemingly straightforward logic, the challenge remains significant to rethink and implement circular design in the manufacturing process. Opinion will also be given on legislation and certification and the viability of new quality standards.

  • 16.30-16.45 CLOSING REMARKS AND END OF DAY ONE

  • DAY 2 OFFICIAL OPENING REMARKS

  • 10.15-10.45 OPENING PANEL DISCUSSION: Tapping into Nature: Transforming Manufacturing Innovation and Sustainability through Nature Inspired Technology

    From windows that prevent bird collisions by mimicking the UV-reflective qualities of spider webs to trains redesigned to resemble birds’ beaks and wind turbine blades that mimic whale flippers, nature provides the perfect platform to tackle manufacturing innovation challenges. The hopes for innovation, increased sustainability and streamlined manufacturing are great as this discipline moves from being a siloed exercise to a more broadly adopted option.

  • 10.45-11.00 FIRESIDE CHAT: Industry 4.0 between Risk and Opportunity: A CEO’s Perspective

    The signs seem good – 4IR tech patent applications are on the rise, ambitions are high and spending on the IIoT in industrial markets looks promising. The so-called fourth industrial revolution, is, however of course not just a matter of technology – the human, societal and investment factors are also at play. Work, global challenges on levels such as natural resources, ageing populations and geopolitical changes also feed in. What does Industry 4.0 mean to manufacturing beyond the terminology? How is Industry 4.0 shaping approaches to strategy and tactics? What other trends are coming up?

  • 11.00-12.00 PANEL DISCUSSION: Industry Needs Women: Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment in the Context of Digitalisation

    Digitalisation and Industry 4.0 will have a profound impact on the content and nature of jobs and, as a result, the skills required to perform them. There is a growing necessity to face multifaceted policy challenges on the path to women’s full inclusion in digital economy and new technological environment. What should be done to make sure that Digitalisation and Industry 4.0 lead to efficient women’s participation in the workforce? What are the opportunities for women in entrepreneurship in the area of Industry 4.0? How can the private sector, governments and civil society pave the way for women to participate in global networking platforms and knowledge hubs providing access to international markets, investments and modern high-tech industries?

  • 12.00-14.30 SPECIAL PLENARY

    SPECIAL ADDRESS

    IN CONVERSATION: The Changing Face of Global Trade and Investment

    How global trade patterns shifting and what are is the outlook for manufacturing-led development now? In the past, manufacturing created jobs and increased productivity. But shifts in technology and industrial automation require increasing adaptation. But how? And how can we mobilise investment and better channel it to improve adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals, drive improved industrialisation and create innovative business models that reconcile economic success and sustainable objectives requires new thinking?

    OFFICIAL PRIZEGIVING: The Mohammed Bin Rashid Initiative for Global Prosperity Winners Announcement

    The Initiative for Global Prosperity unites the world’s leading manufacturers, start-ups and entrepreneurs, governments, UN agencies and philanthropists, academia and researchers, to form a community dedicated to spreading global prosperity through the art of ‘making’. The initiative specifically seeks to recognise noble and novel achievements that have positively contributed to the well being of our world while fostering the values of resilience, community, harmony, and dignity. Exclusive to GMIS 2019, the Global Makers Challenge Award Winners will be announced.

  • 14.30-15.10 GMIS WORKING GROUP SHOWCASE AND PANEL DISCUSSION: Adoption of 4IR Technologies: Safeguarding Critical Manufacturing Infrastructure

    The industrial sector faces multiple and growing challenges around safeguarding its key infrastructure. From constant enabling due to progressive adoption of technologies such as BYOD, mobile computing, the IoT and of course 4IR, the quest for improved operational protection is paramount. What can manufacturers do to manage this phenomenon and what can be refined – what and holistic security strategies combining people, process and technology can be utilised?

  • 15.10-15.50 EURASIA: Driving Diversified Development and Defining the Future of Eurasia’s Manufacturing Competitiveness

    With a high focus on natural resources as key contributors to national economies, challenges around competitive pressures from global markets and relatively concentrated export profiles, Eurasia is seen as a prime region needing to meet the challenge of economic diversification. Increasingly, industrial policies are shifting to towards a desire for more investment-led and innovation-led growth and growing focus on industrial policy creating the conditions to facilitate drive innovation and facilitate manufacturing variety as well as achieving new industrial and integration structures. Acting as a key bridging base between Europe and Asia is the Russian Federation, drawing on its diverse manufacturing base and leading the way around new thinking on digitalisation, innovation and the development of integrative manufacturing policies

  • 15.50-16.30 SOUTH AND EAST ASIA: Made in Asia – What Now, What Next?

    Home to over 40% of the world’s population, the region has rapidly become a world-class manufacturing hub, characterised by large FDI flows and high rate of domestic investments coupled with significant government support for the sector. Increasingly, both South and East Asia are looking to use their strong positions to take advantage both of next-generation manufacturing technologies and define their role in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. At the same time, each regional economy faces its own challenges based on what sort of manufacturing nation it wants to be, the pace of embracing Industry 4.0 and creating futureproofed industrial policy strategies.

  • 14.30-15.15 BREAKOUT 2.1: Smart Manufacturing, Flexible Factories and Microfactorie

    The factory of the past was a rigid thing, constructed on straight lines with components riveted to the floor: essentially a single giant machine. But the demands on the manufacturing industry are changing, and factories may soon become as flexible and versatile as the robotic arms and digital systems they employ. Showcasing the latest research and thinking on flexible factories, this session will look at how factories can become agile enough to change the entire manufacturing business proposition – moving from a service-based business to one of shared ownership and factory timeshares.

  • 15.30-16.15 BREAKOUT 2.2: Advanced IIoT Applications in Manufacturing Plant

    IoT has amalgamated hardware and software with the internet to create a more technically- driven environment. Gartner predicts that by 2020, there will be 20.4 billion IoT devices. Implementation of IoT in the manufacturing industries has formulated innovative ways to collaborate. This session will focus on software defined industrial sensors and protocols, taking an interactive approach.

  • 14.30-15.15 BREAKOUT 2.3: Industry 4.0 and the Road to Smart, Sustainable and Inclusive Cities

    This future-gazing session will look to the future of smart cities.

    Discover how smart cities might transform supply chain design and how smart cities can link into Industry 4.0, what the future of connectivity holds and how smarter cities can create effective, demand-oriented and higher productivity manufacturing enterprises as well as contribute to sustainable development. Plus, what will industrial smart cities look like?

  • 15.30-16.15 BREAKOUT 2.4: Biomimetics in Action Design Workshop: Copying Life to Optimise Making, Manufacturing and Sustainability

    As one of the promising approaches in generating advanced materials, Biomimetics offers to materials scientists and engineers a sustainable path to learn from nature in the development of high performance next generation materials. This workshop will cover both the fundamental exploration of materials inspired by biological systems in nature, and their fabrication and applications in today’s technology.

  • 16.15 END OF DAY TWO

    As one of the promising approaches in generating advanced materials, Biomimetics offers to materials scientists and engineers a sustainable path to learn from nature in the development of high performance next generation materials. This workshop will cover both the fundamental exploration of materials inspired by biological systems in nature, and their fabrication and applications in today’s technology.

  • 10.00-10.15 DAY THREE OFFICIAL OPENING REMARKS

  • 10.15-10.30 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: How does industry see the future of manufacturing - A Technology Leader View

    The impact of the Big Tech sector on manufacturing and new world of making. How does the manufacturing industry view tech? What business models in tech can manufacturing draw inspiration from? How can you ‘think like tech’ to drive innovation, anticipate and drive industry disruption and create new business models? What can ‘Big Tech’ do to help drive the SDGs?

  • 10.30-11.15 OPENING PANEL DISCUSSION: The Artificially Intelligent Manufacturing Sector: The Future of Work, Learning and Human-Centric Automation

    Global connectivity, smart machines and new media are just some of the drivers reshaping how we think about work and what it constitutes – and how we learn and develop the skills to work in the future. Just as manufacturing saw huge benefits from lean, automation and advanced IT, AI promises to offer huge breakthroughs in automation, productivity improvement and more. A positive outlook for the future, perhaps, but uncertainty still exists. Bottom line, AI raises a lot of questions – what are the ones we should be asking? How will disruption affect business operations and strategy? What are the benefits AI offers now? What are the organisational and human complexities thrown up by AI? What does the future of education look like? How can the manufacturing sector anticipate and prepare for changes to attract the right talent and skills? How can students be prepared for their world?

  • 11.15-11.30 FLASH TALK: Industry 5.0 and the Return of Human Manufacturing

    Still in the midst of Industry 4.0 and its vision of near-total automation, resulting cost savings have captured the imagination. Leap into the potential for 5.0, with its scope for full factory automation, mass personalisation and human-touch manufacturing. How far away is ‘human-touch’ manufacturing really? The new terminology – how should we define Industry 5.0? What changes might it bring for manufacturing? What will the 5.0 factory look like?

  • 11.30-12.15 THE BIG QUESTION: Singularity, Robotification and the New Human/Automation Playbook

    Man vs machine or man + machine? Discuss.

    Concerns about singularity, intelligent robots and other machines overtaking humanity were once the realm of sci-fi, yet with advances in deep learning and advances in automation, the popular imagination and beyond is starting to voice more questions around the ethical, political, industrial and real-time impact of

    technological advancement and potential pitfalls. Even Stephen Hawking warned that advancing robotics could ‘spell the end of the human race’, raising questions around what it means to be human and the limitations that should be placed around the ambition of technologists. Other voices claim that more robots and machines are needed, not less. What if humans were no longer top dog? What would it mean for our roles, way of life and aspirations outlined for the 21st century in the last 3 days? What can be classed as inherently human traits that can’t be replicated such as determination, instinct and personal responsibility? Where does the clinical efficiency of machines end – and where do inherently human traits begin? What roles could machines ever play in entrepreneurship and creativity? How close are advances in deep learning to enabling AI to develop complex neural networks similar to the human brain?

  • 12.15-13.00 OFFICIAL CLOSING REMARKS AND INTENTIONS AROUND THE BIGGER JOURNEY: GMIS

    Declaration, Consensus Points and Actions

    As the second Global Manufacturing and Industrialisation Summit draws to a close, this session will reflect on key take-aways, the GMIS Declaration and look ahead to GMIS2019. The official host of the 2019 will also make an official statement and ceremonial handover to the GMIS2020 host country.

  • 13.00 CLOSE OF THE GLOBAL MANUFACTURING AND INDUSTRIALISATION SUMMIT 2019

© GMOL. Please note that this is a working draft programme and sessions, topics, dates and timings are all subject to change.

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